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Casper Day 34… Trust. Confidence. Connection.

Casper Day 34… Trust. Confidence. Connection.
Casper is very responsive and a clear communicator. I am demonstrating how to support and guide him. His over sensing (self preservation) is a lot like my dog Auzzie. 
Yes, it is about working with the physical -asking for step forward, step back… but the bigger picture of awareness for Casper is spiritual, emotional, – Can I leave, do I want to leave? How can I pay attention to details when I need to watch everything else going on? 
He is curious, and the treats and chewing allow his body and mind to keep releasing nervous energy (TMJ motion – the most proprioceptive nerves in the body run through the TMJ) so that I can ask for calm and he can give calm. 
The more I am able to get him feeling calm, the more he will seek that place in himself, because it feels good…

Preparing an untouchable horse to stand still and allow me to touch his face. Haltering him is impossible unless forced into an area he can’t escape. Getting close to him has taken time. Casper will stand and face me, will take treats, will allow me to touch the end of his nose. I move to stand beside his neck or shoulder and he moves away… I’d like him to be OK with being touched and handled. The work I am doing is Equal Partnership, and he is beginning to connect and become a partner. When I ask too much, he leaves, when I get too close, he leaves… but today – 18 minutes total, he didn’t feel the need to leave. Haltering is the intent, when he allows me to put a halter on, I will be very pleased, snow storms and below zero temps will be coming soon, I would like him to be with the other horses.

Casper Day 7

Casper Day 7 
Day 6, I moved Starry in with Casper. Starry is my 20 year old gelding, he lost his mate in 2017. He lives with 2 mares and a gelding, but he gets pushed around and feels disconnected. He is an amazing guy, but lately he has lost his sparkle. I’m hoping he and Casper end up as best buddies.

With a new horse in his round pen, Casper is thrilled… We had gained a good connection, yet after 6 days, he remained untouchable, in his mind and senses. The first goal in our partnership is to stand close to him and have him feel comfortable with this. We’ve achieved this. Next is to develop trust, and with his permission – touch him, groom him, lift his feet for the farrier.

After trust is developed, another goal is to be able to move him from the round pen to a sheltered paddock – closer to the house, off the road. A bad storm could hit anytime, and his comfort is my concern. Bonding with Starry is helpful as I will lead Starry where ever I want them both to be, and Casper will follow, he will not run off or leave.

This is an immediate relief and gives us time to follow the right path. Casper is highly sensing… his level of trust is minimal, and must be gained one step at a time. Over faced, he will back track. Yes, there are ways to ‘train / desensitize’ him, but those ways don’t honor and enhance his spirit, intelligence and integrity. Casper is special, slow and sure will win his heart forever.

In this video – Caspers level of comfort is less than it was before I moved Starry in with him. He is grateful for companionship, but is more hyperaware of everything around us. His ears are moving faster, in all directions than when it was just him and me. I took this opportunity to demonstrate his body language when I acted rudely, then how he changed when I gave him more space.

CASPER DAY 2 & 3

Casper Day 2 
Building trust one step at a time. He came right up to me first thing and bumped his nose to my hand in a clear Mutual Greeting! (High Five)
Lots of Mirroring – I felt and followed what he did, where he went and in turn he followed me too. He met my dogs – all is well with that. Did I mention this guy is amazing?

Casper Day 3
This time Casper met my cat and revisited the dogs. We started off with just uncovering his hay. I went out several hours later and gave him his morning meal, with cut pieces of carrots and I brought a jolly ball. We started off clicker treating – touch the ball and get a carrot. The reasoning is – to play with me – get close to his face, take a treat from my hand. He is so polite… More play, More mirroring… I asked several times if he would allow me to remove his halter. No…
This evening I took him a bucket of water, and asked to remove his halter. He stood still, looked left, looked right, looked left and stood there, I touched the halter, he was uncertain, but I touched the strap, he stood still, I undid the strap and took the halter off… No treats, No Coercion, No Compliance – just trust… Magical…

Coffee with Casper – Day 1 after adoption.

Beginning of connection 12-7-19
I am now owned by 5 amazing horses. I love and care for them, day after day, year after year. Last week I fell in love with #5 – Casper – by the look in his eye. 

Horses abandoned to live on their own, on land… Then they needed to be removed from that land – a private case, not BLM removing horses from Public lands. A rescue organization stepped up – took them all to their facility. The horses were brought back to health and given amazing care. Thousands of hours of care, love and patience. These rescue organization women and their team are astounding humans – offering their heart and soul to horses in need. The last of this group – Casper, had been at the rescue a year and a half – all the others adopted out. While caregivers fiercely bond to horses, life is taken up by many horses and a mission. The most difficult part of being a rescuer is knowing they are the middle of the horses life plan, with the awesome responsibility to keep those special ones long enough to find the perfect placement. Casper needed his forever person, and his forever mates, and things came together perfectly for us all.

When I looked in Casper’s eye, at his facial expression, mannerisms, I saw a sensitive soul – his communication is clear, every action speaks volumes. Many people who adopt horses have a job for them to do, an idea of how they should behave. Some/ most horses want to have a say in how their minds and bodies are used. Horses have every right to be treated as a partner and with decency. Humans are fully capable of listening to horses – and working in ways that enhance, not kill their spirit.

I know I have the patience, training, education and empathic nature Casper needs to connect to and gain trust. Also – most importantly – I have a lack of a goal for his ‘usefulness’ in what he will do for me. My goal is to see him blossom, and let us know how/ if he wants to fit in, share his gifts, interact, share his curiosity… I so strongly felt this adoption was the right thing to do, without considering family naysayers and friends who would say “How many do you ‘have’ now?”. We don’t “have” each other – we are here, and we seek how our lives are better together, than not.

Understanding that my life goal is saving every wild horse on the planet… this is a whole ‘other’ story… Casper created a spark in my mind… What I can do for each domesticated horse is really simple. I offer a perspective that gives horse owners, caregivers, horse handlers and the public who simply observe horses – simple ideas, communication hints for better understanding each other. I am highly empathic, I’ve done bodywork with horses since 2003, having studied constantly – almost every modality, I have lots of tips to share for others from brain science to connection, along with courses showing light touch and horses responses you can do with your horse.

I create online courses teach to evaluation areas of discomfort, and how to release tension. As far as the body work I do with horses – it is a high level of care – find primary cause of body’s issues and fix them- realignment. I’ve just completed Renee Tuckers program – Tucker BioKinetic Technique – Six of us have completed the last course – TBT Multi – Layered Alignment Course. 

Casper has inspired me, I look forward to him connecting and meeting the other horses. His nature is sweet and pure. I now plan on creating online courses to teach horses’ communication and behavior. Casper’s communication is so clear – he will be the best teacher, along with my other horses interactions too.

The Cambridge Declaration on Consciousness*

http://fcmconference.org

On this day of July 7, 2012, a prominent international group of cognitive neuroscientists, neuropharmacologists, neurophysiologists, neuroanatomists and computational neuroscientists gathered at The University of Cambridge to reassess the neurobiological substrates of conscious experience and related behaviors in human and non-human animals. While comparative research on this topic is naturally hampered by the inability of non-human animals, and often humans, to clearly and readily communicate about their internal states, the following observations can be stated unequivocally:

  •  The field of Consciousness research is rapidly evolving. Abundant new techniques and strategies for human and non-human animal research have been developed. Consequently, more data is becoming readily available, and this calls for a periodic reevaluation of previously held preconceptions in this field. Studies of non-human animals have shown that homologous brain circuits correlated with conscious experience and perception can be selectively facilitated and disrupted to assess whether they are in fact necessary for those experiences. Moreover, in humans, new non-invasive techniques are readily available to survey the correlates of consciousness.
  • The neural substrates of emotions do not appear to be confined to cortical structures. In fact, subcortical neural networks aroused during affective states in humans are also critically important for generating emotional behaviors in animals. Artificial arousal of the same brain regions generates corresponding behavior and feeling states in both humans and non-human animals. Wherever in the brain one evokes instinctual emotional behaviors in non-human animals, many of the ensuing behaviors are consistent with experienced feeling states, including those internal states that are rewarding and punishing. Deep brain stimulation of these systems in humans can also generate similar affective states. Systems associated with affect are concentrated in subcortical regions where neural homologies abound. Young human and non- human animals without neocortices retain these brain-mind functions. Furthermore, neural circuits supporting behavioral/electrophysiological states of attentiveness, sleep and decision making appear to have arisen in evolution as early as the invertebrate radiation, being evident in insects and cephalopod mollusks (e.g., octopus).
  • Birds appear to offer, in their behavior, neurophysiology, and neuroanatomy a striking case of parallel evolution of consciousness. Evidence of near human-like levels of consciousness has been most dramatically observed in African grey parrots. Mammalian and avian emotional networks and cognitive microcircuitries appear to be far more homologous than previously thought. Moreover, certain species of birds have been found to exhibit neural sleep patterns similar to those of mammals, including REM sleep and, as was demonstrated in zebra finches, neurophysiological patterns, previously thought to require a mammalian neocortex. Magpies in particular have been shown to exhibit striking similarities to humans, great apes, dolphins, and elephants in studies of mirror self-recognition.
  • In humans, the effect of certain hallucinogens appears to be associated with a disruption in cortical feedforward and feedback processing. Pharmacological interventions in non-human animals with compounds known to affect conscious behavior in humans can lead to similar perturbations in behavior in non-human animals. In humans, there is evidence to suggest that awareness is correlated with cortical activity, which does not exclude possible contributions by subcortical or early cortical processing, as in visual awareness. Evidence that human and non- human animal emotional feelings arise from homologous subcortical brain networks provide compelling evidence for evolutionarily shared primal affective qualia.

We declare the following: “The absence of a neocortex does not appear to preclude an organism from experiencing affective states. Convergent evidence indicates that non-human animals have the neuroanatomical, neurochemical, and neurophysiological substrates of conscious states along with the capacity to exhibit intentional behaviors. Consequently, the weight of evidence indicates that humans are not unique in possessing the neurological substrates that generate consciousness. Non- human animals, including all mammals and birds, and many other creatures, including octopuses, also possess these neurological substrates.”

* The Cambridge Declaration on Consciousness was written by Philip Low and edited by Jaak Panksepp, Diana Reiss, David Edelman, Bruno Van Swinderen, Philip Low and Christof Koch. The Declaration was publicly proclaimed in Cambridge, UK, on July 7, 2012, at the Francis Crick Memorial Conference on Consciousness in Human and non-Human Animals, at Churchill College, University of Cambridge, by Low, Edelman and Koch. The Declaration was signed by the conference participants that very evening, in the presence of Stephen Hawking, in the Balfour Room at the Hotel du Vin in Cambridge, UK. The signing ceremony was memorialized by CBS 60 Minutes.

My new online equine bodywork course is getting great reviews!

My new online equine bodywork course is getting great reviews!
Equine Partnered Bodywork will introduce a light touch technique we can do WITH our horse. We will discover the connection of how to ask for and observe our horse’s consent to be with us. By applying a light touch to the neck of a horse, we will see and recognize different levels of response. As a result, we will discover that by applying a light touch and staying on the point or area, the horse will ‘process and release’ their own tension, be it physical, mental, emotional. We in turn will feel our stress level melt away into relaxation. (This works with dogs as well, course coming soon)
Nancy Horne
“Nancy, it’s wonderful! Not only does it show some very gentle, effective bodywork techniques, it also really leads a person into a meditative state with horses.
I also like the Udemy website, they provide a very easy format to be able to navigate the different segments. “
Stormy May – The Path of the Horse”
It’s wonderful ! and so easy to follow, understand and easy to do .
I hope to be able to give a retired horse a little human attention in the near future and he will deffinatly feel the benifit of what Nancy is showing !!!!!! Thank you”
Jennie Hellkvist
https://www.udemy.com/equine-partnered-bodywork-introduction